Systems

Jeet Kune Do

ayinyangJeet Kune Do (JKD) is the martial art created by Bruce Lee (Li Jun Fan/Li Siou Lung). JKD or Way of the Intercepting Fist may be classified as a form of modern martial art. Although Jeet Kune Do is primarily inspired from Chinese gung fu, Western fencing and boxing it is more accurately, Bruce Lee’s martial art. Lee felt that a real fight was unpredictable and that most classical styles emphasized dead patterns instead of live and spontaneous training. Lee also came to the conclusion the MA was Universal and that “unless there is a being with more than two arms and two legs, that there is only one style of fighting, the human style”. So, Lee conceptualized martial art as a whole and embarked upon a scientific course. Not one that blended styles but one that was born of the idea of non-style, geometry, physics and kinesiology. One as he described as “simple, direct and non-classical”. At the same time that Lee was creating his martial art he was also very much into philosophy. One source of philosophy was Zen. One of the primary tenants of Zen is detachment or more clearly, non-attachment. The tenant of non-attachment can be a paradox for most. However for Bruce Lee, it may have been the perfect vehicle of understanding (enlightenment) that he needed to create his Jeet Kune Do. While non-attachment is a mental state, non-engagement is its physical counterpart. In the sense of fighting attachment or engagement imputes struggle. So with non-engagement through the use of physical science, our goal is non-struggle or to fight with the least amount of struggle. JKD however is the way of the intercepting fist and seeks to end the fight as quickly as possible through striking. In JKD engagement is any touch reference other than the strike itself. So ours is a very aggressive form of non-engagement which is a paradox to most but the true vehicle of understanding and expressing JKD. JKD primarily emphasizes stepping and evading in order to strike without prior touch, secondarily deflecting in order to strike and lastly trapping & grappling in order to strike. For decades following Bruce Lee’s death JKD was promoted as the concept of cross training and doing your own thing. This view of JKD gave birth to the creation of many freestyles and hybrids throughout the world. Not a bad thing but not JKD. Bruce Lee clearly researched the totality of martial art, which includes striking and grappling both standing up and on the ground. But because Lee found that the “height of cultivation lead to simplicity” and that non-engagement is the height of that simplicity. JKD is a scientific vehicle of expressing simplicity in the chaos of fighting. Although Lee is recognized as being an Action Superstar from Hong Kong, he was actually born in San Francisco and lived in Hong Kong until the age of 18. Around 1959 he returned to the U.S. and eventually attended the University of Washington in Seattle, where he majored in philosophy. There he began the journey of creating his own method of martial art. While in the States, Lee ran three schools of martial art, Seattle WA, Oakland CA and Los Angeles California.

Bruce Lee Lineage Martial Arts

  • Seattle Period
  • Oakland Period
  • Los Angeles Period

Although with distinctions, these periods of development include overlap and similarities.

In 1971 he returned to Hong Kong to make movies and in 1973 unexpectedly passed away. Around 1971, Bruce Lee closed his school of  Jeet Kune Do, “for reasons both public and private”. However, Lee gave permission to his three “assistant instructors”, to carry on “in private” and teach a select and small group of individuals. Taky Kimura: Seattle, WA James Lee: Oakland, CA Dan Inosanto: Los Angeles, CA.

Boxer Rebellion International: Bruce Lee Lineage Martial Arts History

My introduction to Bruce Lee and Jeet Kune Do began in 1975, when I read the compilation of his notes, which were condensed, edited and organized into the book, “Tao of Jeet Kune Do”
Like many other martial artists, I began integrating principles and techniques of Jeet Kune Do into “my martial art” from 1975-1986, based on my understanding of it, from books, magazines articles and Bruce Lee’s movies.
Louis Campos: In the fall of 1986 I moved from Michigan to California and began to actually train, in “BL Lineage MA”… This method was presented to me through the “Inosanto lineage” and was taught to me by my friend, training partner and mentor, Louis Campos.
dan-inosantoDan Inosanto: From 1987 to 1991 I attended Sifu Dan’s Phase classes and then again in 1994 at his “new gym”, I attended his Jun Fan/JKD Class. His teaching was very multifaceted and variation oriented. Although I enjoyed training with Sifu Inosanto, I lived too far away from the Academy to be a consistent and regular student. In my opinion, Sifu Dan has continued to teach Jun Fan Gung Fu “Early JKD” and do his best to keep his friend’s art alive “without commercializing it, too much”, while doing his own thing in regards to training and teaching other arts. In my opinion, Sifu Inosanto is not only the Father of Cross Training in “Modern Martial Arts” but also the Father of “SEA Martial Arts” in the West:) He deserves much credit outside of his relationship with Bruce Lee and stands on his own as an Icon of Modern Martial Arts:) From Sifu Dan, I learned very much about sectoring, zoning and universality and appreciate the time that I did spend with him.

TedLL2Ted Lucaylucay: In 1987 Sifu Ted Lucaylucay began to teach a small group of dedicated students at the Inosanto Academy in Marina Del Rey, CA. I was among this group of students and participated from 1987 to 1991. In 1991 I was awarded my Instructor’s certificate in Jun Fan Gung Fu/Kickboxing & Kali and went on to become an Executive Officer of Sifu Ted’s “LK/JA”, Lucaylucay Kali/JKD Association. I subsequently trained with Lucaylucay on a private and semi-private basis until the passing of Sifu Ted in March of 1996. Ted was often a guest at our home and spent the weekends with us on a monthly basis. Ted frequented my LA Chinatown Gym and taught there often. Ted always emphasized sparring, with and without weapons. I remember that his main concern for me, over the years, was to help me to develop a strong left hook. Most if not all of my private sessions with Ted included sparring with him personaly and it was a great experience. In regards to Bruce Lee and Jeet Kune Do, Ted did not like the term JKD Concepts, he thought that it would cause confusion. However, he did say that he learned Jeet Kune Do as a concept “from Dan Inosanto”.  Although Ted would never clearly define a physical Jeet Kune Do, he did share with me what he called the earlier training methods. This was in reference to training in Dan Inosanto’s backyard when they still called what they did Jeet Kune Do, however Ted was more comfortable with calling this Chinese Gung Fu/Kickboxing or Jun Fan Gung Fu/Kickboxing. Ted was fond of classical martial arts, self defense, combative sports and always balanced his training and teaching accordingly. Cultivation and quality are the words that I choose to remember Ted’s approach by.

tedwongTed Wong: In 1991 I had the pleasure of meeting one of Bruce Lee’s private students. Between that time and 1994, I asked Sifu Ted Wong, on numerous occasions, to accept me as a student… He politely told me that he really wasn’t accepting any new students but that he would keep me in mind. In 1996, After the unexpected passing of my teacher and dear friend Ted Lucaylucay, I went through a period of confusion and lack of clear direction in regards to my martial art. In the winter of 1997 I phoned Sifu Ted Wong and invited him to lunch. I hadn’t seen him for at least 3 years. We met at the “Golden City” restaurant in L.A. Chinatown and we talked about many things… We talked about loyalty and dedication to one’s teacher and to one’s chosen method of martial art. He then invited me to go across the street to my gym and he proceeded to share with me, the “Latter Stage” of Bruce Lee’s Jeet Kune Do. I trained privately with Ted at his house in Montery Park whenever his and my schedule would permit it. I asked to train with him full time and he said he did not have the time. Ted visited many times to my Club at Alpine Park Rec. Ctr. in LA Chinatown, to teach workshops to me and my students and continued to do so after my move to Thailand. In December of 2001 I moved to Thailand and Ted wrote a letter for me to give to the Thailand Ministry of Education saying that I had his authorization to teach his “Latter Stage JKD” Jeet Kune Do. Before I left, Ted told me that although it is important to have an instructor, that the the art itself would teach you. He was very right. Ted came to see us in Thailand in 2003 and again in 2007. He enjoyed himself very much! I continued to travel from Thailand to the USA every year and always made it a priority to train and spend time with Ted. In 2007 during his trip to Thailand, Ted told me that he was happy with my progress and thanked me for preserving and perpetuating Bruce Lee’s martial art and that he respected my perseverance and ability. The last time I saw Ted was in August of 2009 for training at the Park and of course Dim Sum! The last time I spoke to him was on the phone sometime during the spring of 2010. Ted had agreed to help us with a project in Thailand, An “MMA Reality Based TV Show”. He was also due to visit us in Singapore for a seminar.
All of my Mentors have influenced me greatly and have helped me to better understand “Bruce Lee’s Martial Arts Journey” and the science, art and philosophy of martial arts in general.

Respects and Thanks to Them All:)

– Mark Stewart

Carrying the Jeet Kune Do Torch

In 1973 Bruce Lee passed away and Dan Inosanto was convinced by many to keep JKD alive. What to do? At first Inosanto continued teaching Jeet Kune Do and offered Escrima/Arnis (Philippine weaponry) as a separate subject. As time went on, the two arts were aligned and taught together and/or taught separately at different periods of time by Inosanto and his graduates.

  1. Kali/JKD by Ted Lucaylucay – One of Dan Inosanto’s early graduates in both Kali and Jeet Kune Do was Ted Lucaylucay. Lucaylucay was a pioneer in the propagation of Kali/JKD (Jun Fan Gung Fu/Kickboxing) and was the first instructor to produce instructional videos and open commercial schools. Lucaylucay was also the first, second generation instructor to create his own Association.
  2. JKD Concepts by Dan Inosanto – Through continued research and development, Dan Inosanto added more arts that were aligned and/or taught separately at different periods of time. Eventually the whole movement was referred to as JKD Concepts. This movement is attributed to Bruce Lee’s philosophy, as interpreted by Dan Inosanto (Cross training, research and development, “doing your own thing”. Eventually the term Jeet Kune Do was no longer used by Inosanto to describe Bruce Lee’s actual method and was replaced with the terms Chinese Kickboxing, Jun Fan Gung Fu or The Jun Fan Martial Arts. Jeet Kune Do became known as “the concept of cross training” but not “the method created by Bruce Lee”. As I understand it, Sifu/Guro Inosanto does not use the term “Concepts” now, but has replaced it with Inosanto Martial Arts, which include Jun Fan, Muay Thai, FMA, Silat, BJJ, Shooto, etc…
  3. Jeet Kune Do by Ted Wong – One of the founding members of the Bruce Lee FoundationTM is Ted Wong. Ted Wong is known as the last private student and training partner of Bruce Lee and is considered by many to be his protege. Ted Wong is known for teaching possibly the “purest form” and final stage of Bruce Lee’s martial art as expressed by Bruce Lee, before his passing.
  4. BRI Jeet Kune do by Mark Stewart – The curriculum is based on the “Latter Stage” JKD platform and includes facets of Jun Fan Gung Fu (early JKD) Wrestling and Jiu Jitsu…

BRI “Latter Stage” Jeet Kune Do
“Latter Stage” JKD is about dynamic and explosive footwork that can be applied to enhance your stand up game regardless of your background. JKD at it’s highest level is about delivery and avoidance with emphasis “in delivery” on full body weight, mass accelerated movement and recovery! While most people know JKD as a blend of many styles, in reality it is Bruce’s application of geometry, physics and kinesiology in the realm of effective Stand Up Fighting. It is the ultimate adaptable vehicle!

Kali

Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) also known as Kali, Escrima or Arnis, contain techniques brought from India, Malaya, Indonesia, and China. During the time of the Hindu-Malayan and Madjapahit Empires (5th and 12th centuries), more advanced military techniques bolstered indigenous military technique. The military experience gained through battles with the military forces of Spain were also used to improve the techniques which already existed before the 16th century.
Because there exist numerous systems, it can be speculated that self-experience as well as trial and error have influenced family and regional systems that have survived to the present time.
What Is Kali Abtik?
Knife, Stick and everyday objects may be used as weapons of self-defense and although a separate subject from, are quite interwoven with empty-hand methods or an extension thereof. Kali Abtik a modern method with a strong traditional root that includes influences from Boxing and JKD. Kali Abtik is an art that includes both edged and impact weapons, drilling and freestyle sparring with padded weapons and safety gear. Kali Abtik also includes CQD/Mano-Mano techniques designed for defense against weapons and close quarter defense. Guro Stewart considers Kali Abtik to be directly inspired from Guro Ted’s Kali, with emphasis on “Abtik”. Abtik is defined as the use of explosive stepping, pivoting and sinking or raising to power and time the stroke.

History and Lineage

ted_mark_boxeIn 1987 Ted Lucaylucay began to teach a small group of dedicated students at the Inosanto Academy in Marina Del Rey, CA. I was among this group of students and participated from 1987 to 1991. In 1991 I was awarded my Instructor’s certificate and went on to become an Executive Officer of Guro Ted’s LK/JA Lucaylucay Kali/JKD. I subsequently trained with Lucaylucay on a private and semi-private basis until the passing of Guro Ted in March of 1996. Prior to training with Lucaylucay, I had trained in both Doce Pares and Pikiti Tirsia under Guro Edgar Guevara from 1979 to 1985.
TedLucaylucay“Ted Lucaylucay was one of the kindest and most generous men that I have ever met. He was like an older brother to me and I will never forget him. I can see him now, wearing his suspenders, laid back and casual but with distinct depth, form and flair. Guro Ted was a man of structure and solid basics. Ted LucayLucay was the first student to graduate under Dan Inosanto from the Kali Academy in both Kali and Jeet Kune Do. Ted received his certification in both these arts but he was also certified an instructor by Leo Giron in Arnis , Angel Cabales in Serrada and by Ben Largusa in the Villabrille-Largusa Kali system.
During the period that I trained with him, (1987-1996) Ted emphasized three distinct, yet aligned areas with me. These areas were Boxing/Kickboxing (Jun Fan and Panantukan-Sikaran), Gung Fu (Wing Chun and Jun Fan) and Weaponry (Kali and Fencing) .

Boxing/Kickboxing: Ted emphasized modern western boxing that was influenced by Panantukan as taught by his father “Lucky” Lucaylucay, Richard Bustillio and his own research and development. He liked to refer to his boxing as blade awareness boxing. In the last few years before his death, Ted primarily emphasized the Panantukan aspects with me. I feel that this was a process of refinement towards further alignment of the three areas that we trained in. Ted emphasized kicking that he learned from Jun Fan Kickboxing. Very direct and powerful, but with a snap. Like most Ted also incorporated the Muay Thai hook kick, but was not fond of using the Thai pads like the Thais do (holding both pads together allowing for a broad point of impact). Ted preferred instead to use one Thai pad and one focus mitt. He preferred a smaller target for accuracy and used the focus mitt as a brace to absorbe the shock. Ted was also highly influenced and fond of the kicks of Savate which he felt was like fencing with the feet. Like most, Ted also included the use of elbows and knees, but they seemed to have their place and were not over emphasized. Although the term Sikaran was used and we did learn classical kicks from the source, the term was also used to describe kicking in general.

Gung Fu: Ted empahsized classical wing chun techniques, drills and strategy including chi sao. Ted also taught the basic trapping routes from Jun Fan Gung Fu. When I look at Ted’s empty hand sets, I see a high influence of wing chun combined with mano mano. In the last few years before his death I began to get more interested in Bruce Lee and Jeet Kune Do again. Although Ted would never clearly define a physical Jeet Kune Do, he did share with me what he called the earlier training methods. This was in reference to training in Dan Inosanto’s backyard when they still called what they did Jeet Kune Do, however Ted was more comfortable with calling this Chinese Gung Fu/Kickboxing or Jun Fan Gung Fu/Kickboxing because of Sifu Inosanto’s promise to Bruce Lee, not to commercialize JKD. In his personal style,Ted preferred the orthodox boxing lead vs. strong side lead and also preferred the horizontal fist to the verticle fist, for the lead straight punch. However in Jun Fan Gung Fu/Kickboxing he taught the strong side lead and verticle fist, lead straight punch.

Kali: Ted’s primary influences were from Kali, Serrada and Largo Mano as well as his own research and development. Although we used a variety of weapons, Ted emphasized heavy weapon training with us. This was to build a solid structure and basics with the ability to end the fight quickly. He was fond of using the term Abtik which is to utilize, stepping, sinking and turning to power the stroke. Ted was a big beleiver in the importance of footwork, especially angulation. In the last few years prior to his death, Ted emphasized western fencing techniques (Serafino influence), training methods and strategies with the stick. He also emphasized the attached hubud drill stressing cqd with and without weapons (knife/stick/mano mano) with locks, takedowns and chokes/submissions.
Ted always emphasized sparring, with and without weapons. I remember that his main concern for me, over the years, was to help me to develop a strong left hook. Most if not all of my private sessions with Ted included sparring with him personaly and it was a great experience. In regards to Bruce Lee and Jeet Kune Do, Ted did not like the term JKD Concepts, he thought that it would cause confusion and he was right. However, he did say that he learned Jeet Kune Do as a concept “from Dan Inosanto”. Ted was fond of classical martial arts, self defense, combative sports and always balanced his training and teaching accordingly. Cultivation and quality are the words that I choose to remember Guro Ted’s approach by. He was the greatest and I miss him dearly.

Kali Abtik: Lucaylucay – Stewart Panuntukan/Sikaran
Panuntukan means “the art of fist fighting” and in Visayan is also known as “Sinumbagay”. The term suntukan comes from the Tagalog word for punch, suntok. It is the Filipino term for a fistfight or brawl and for fist fighting or boxing. The Visayan terms pangamot and pakamot “use of hands” come from the Cebuano word for hand, kamot. Due to Cebuano language pronunciation quirks, they are also pronounced nativley as pangamut and pakamut, thus the variation of spelling across literature. Mano-mano comes from the Spanish word for “hand”, mano, and can translate to “two hands” or “hand-to-hand”. Another term that is used by many styles is Cadena de Mano, Spanish for “hand chain”.

In our lineage, Panuntukan is generally attributed to the empty hands and boxing system integrated by “Lucky” Lucaylucay into the Empty Hand Filipino martial arts of the “Lucky” Lucaylucay, Ted Lucaylucay and Inosanto Kali systems (Although Guro Inosanto had other Instructors as well) and was developed on the West Coast of the United States.

Guro Lucky said that originally, he wanted to call his art Suntukan, but he was concerned that it would be confused with Shotokan Karate, so he used the term Panuntukan instead.The terms panuntukan and its sibling component pananjakman or sikaran (for the kicking aspect – possibly a corruption of panadiyakan or pananadiyakan) are virtually unknown in the Philippines and are used more in Western Kali/Eskrima systems of Filipino-American origin.

Dirty Boxing is a contemporary westernized term used by a few instructors to describe panuntukan. The term is also widely used in MMA for clinch fighting, specifically for punching in the clinch. A part of the Filipino Martial Arts (Kali, Escrima, Arnis)

Panuntukan/Sikaran utilizes nearly every part of the anatomy as a human weapon. Filipino Boxing makes use of elbows, knees and punches but with slightly less emphasis on kicking. Because it’s based on knife fighting, the kicks “Sikaran” are mostly performed at the low line. Some favorite tools include head butts, finger jabs, claws, palms, slaps, forearm strikes, hammer fists, knuckle fists, back fists, thumb gouges, fish hooks, shoulder butts, sweeps, bolo punches, clinching, all types of elbows and knees and low kicks in combination with western boxing punches.”

The Lucaylucay – Stewart, Kali Abtik Lineage Panantukan/Sikaran is a Western Boxing Based System (Blade Awareness Boxing) with Facets of Mano Mano (Kali Empty Hand “Kali,Silat, Kun Tao”) It’s approach is less complex than others, “Direcho”…

“One Filipino fighter who had tested this hybrid method in actual competition was Lucky Lucaylucay, featured in the article “Did the Filipino Martial Arts Revolutionize Boxing?” by Lilia Inosanto-Howe published in Inside Kung Fu Magazine. The following are excerpts from Howe’s article: “Lucky Lucaylucay amateur boxing champion of Kauai and Honolulu, son of Buenaventura “Kid Bentura” Lucaylucay, a Filipino immigrant who had become the professional boxing champion of Kauai and Honolulu. Lucky Lucaylucay saw the melding of Filipino martial arts and Western boxing firsthand. “In the Philippines, the preferred method for knife fighting is with the blade pointed downward. If your practice is based only on empty bands, you can take punches, so your strategy is sometimes based on taking a punch.

On the other hand, if your practice is based on knife fighting, you have to become much more sophisticated with your footwork, evasions and delivery because one wrong move could mean death. “Filipino boxing is exactly like knife fighting, except instead of cutting with a blade, we strike with a closed fist.”

Hybrid Stand Up Fighting / Integrated Kickboxing: Hybrid Stand Up Fighting / Integrated Kickboxing is the Dynamic Integration of Latter Stage JKD (Jun Fan KB), Panuntukan/Sikaran (Filipino KB), Muay Thai (Thai KB) and Savate (French KB). Presented in an isolated and integrated platform. These major styles of kickboxing will serve to enhance your stand up skills and are designed for both street and ring/cage. For more information on the component systems, “there is plenty out there”…

– Mark Stewart

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